grey_bard: (Useless Knowledge?)
As distinctive a visual figure as she is, Captain Phasma has not actually had many lines. Yet few as they are, they are consistent, painting a very distinctive verbal picture. There is such a thing as a specific Phasma voice. As a dialogue obsessive writer, I felt the need to collect and analyze it all, and since I put the work in, I felt that I might as well share it.

Collected here is every line of Phasma dialogue which I could find at the time of writing this. If I am missing any lines from The Force Awakens, Before the Awakening and Poe Dameron #2, let me know!

Analysis:

Phasma's speech patterns are precise and educated, bordering on formal. In all situations except her short period as a hostage on Starkiller, she projects self-assurance. Arguably, she is fully aware of this effect, and using it intentionally.

Read more... )Transcript

Read more... )
Also available on Tumblr here: http://grey-bard.tumblr.com/post/147169164814/captain-phasma-dialogue-analysis-and-transcript
grey_bard: (Default)

Collected here are Clint 's most important lines of dialogue from the movie, as an aid to writers who want to write him. At less than 10% of the runtime of the movie, this counts as fair use for educational purposes. Also included as a bonus at the end of the transcript and dialogue file are Clint's few lines from Thor, since they are both short and extremely important to a certain sector of Avengers fandom.

I had thought I was through with creating and analyzing dialogue files and transcripts, but I was beta-reading a Clint fic, and saw the need.

Analysis

Analysis with spoilers )

In fact, he has an easy to miss but definite tendency toward phrasing things for subtle dramatic effect which recurs again and again. Often this is punctuated and emphasized by stage business with his bow and/or arrows. I find it likely that this tendency might carry over to other objects that happen to be in his hands which aren't his bow and arrows, but that is speculation.

 

More spoiler-filled analysis )

And now, for your own analysis and convenience...

The Transcript:

A transcript of all of Hawkeye's most important lines in The Avengers (2012) and Thor (2011) )

The Audio File:

For your listening convenience, here's an audio file of his dialogue from the movies. The sound quality isn't perfect, but was cleaned up as much as possible.

http://www.sendspace.com/file/4j1xto

 

Previous Avengers Dialogue Analysis posts:

Black Widow dialogue analysis, transcript and audio file for The Avengers (2012)

Bruce Banner/The Hulk dialogue analysis, transcript and audio file for The Avengers (2012)

Captain America dialogue analysis, transcript and audio file for Captain America (2011)

 

grey_bard: (Default)
Because I love Steve Rogers very, very much, because I'm a dialogue obsessive and because I found him frustratingly hard to write, last year, after Captain America: The First Avenger came out, I made an audio dialogue file of all his most important lines. I think you've guessed by now that it wasn't to be my last.

Collected here are Steve's most important lines of dialogue from Captain America: The First Avenger, as an aid to writers who want to write him. At less than 10% of the runtime of the movie, this counts as fair use for educational purposes.

This post was created with the transcription aid of yunafire[profile] yunafire.

Analysis:

Because Steve Rogers, even before the serum, never hesitates to tell anyone what he thinks, it's easy to miss the fact that he doesn't actually talk very much. He always makes his opinions known and he's happy to talk with friends, but he doesn't need as many words to do it. Captain America has fewer lines in his own movie than Black Widow has in The Avengers.

Because of this, and because it shows him in a wider variety of moods and contexts than The Avengers, I've decided to transcribe and analyze his dialogue in Captain America: The First Avenger instead of The Avengers.

Steve tends to speak in short, slightly choppy phrases and sentences, and is prone to dropping unnecessary words, particularly at the beginning of sentences. (Not always, but generally.) See: "You start running, they'll never let you stop. You stand up, push back. Can't say no forever, right?" and "Got hit, couldn't shake it." Much of the humor and emotional content of his speech is carried entirely by tone of voice, which, while not wildly dramatic, is extremely expressive. His joking tone is wry when he's feeling down, sly when he isn't and usually self-deprecating either way.

 

More analysis )

And now, for your own analysis and convenience...

The Transcript:


A transcript of all of Captain America's most important lines in Captain America: The First Avenger )

The Audio File:

For your listening convenience, here's an audio file of his dialogue from the movie. The sound quality isn't perfect, but was cleaned up as much as possible. This file was created for my own use last year, shortly after the movie came out and is slightly less complete when it comes to short, extraneous dialogue.

http://anonym.to/?http://www.sendspace.com/file/8h76pe

grey_bard: (Default)

Collected here are Bruce 's most important lines of dialogue from the movie, as an aid to writers who want to write him. At less than 10% of the runtime of the movie, this counts as fair use for educational purposes.

This post was created with the transcription aid of yunafire [profile] yunafireand at her request.

Analysis:

Bruce Banner frequently uses incomplete sentences, although they aren't always short. He sometimes phrases things in subtly unconventional but evocative ways.

Analysis with spoilers )
Banner's tone of voice often borders on the apologetic. He phrases sentences as questions. He frequently pauses and uses hesitation words such as uh, ah, and um, and often punctuates his speech with short, quiet, and sometimes self-deprecating laughs. These can be read as diffidence, hesitation or pauses for thought and careful speech. Arguably, Bruce Banner's habitual speech patterns can be read as intentionally and calculatedly non-threatening.

The other side of this is that Banner is capable of deliberate and subtle intimidation. In his first scene with Black Widow, his pauses and tone of voice become insinuating and menacing.

Further analysis with spoilers )

And now, for your own analysis and convenience...

The Transcript:

 

A transcript of all of Bruce Banner and the Hulk's most important lines in Avengers )

The Audio File:

For your listening convenience, here's an audio file of his English dialogue from the movie. The sound quality isn't perfect, but was cleaned up as much as possible.
http://anonym.to/?http://www.sendspace.com/file/4tpog0

 

grey_bard: (Default)

Because some of you might be dialogue obsessives the way I'm a dialogue obsessive...

Collected here are Natasha's most important lines of dialogue from the movie, as an aid to writers who want to write her. At less than 10% of the runtime of the movie, this counts as fair use for educational purposes. I think this counts as education.

Analysis:

Black Widow's dialogue is characterized by casual vernacular speech with light sarcasm and many contractions, but is completely without slang words or pop culture references. Natasha's speech pattern uses both long, complex, grammatically complete sentences and short sentences with implied verbs or subjects equally, with no preference between the two, but her speech rarely trails off into ellipsis or an implied conclusion except in emotional moments.

Further analysis with spoilers )

And now, for your own analysis and convenience...

The Transcript:


A transcript of all of Black Widow's most important lines )

The Audio File:

For your listening convenience, here's an audio file of her English dialogue transcribed here along with some dialogue from other characters for context. The sound quality isn't perfect, but was cleaned up as much as possible.

 http://anonym.to/?http://www.sendspace.com/file/bm8fed

grey_bard: (Useless Knowledge?)
It's that time again! Award show season, everyone's favorite annual case of deja vu. And time for that favorite play along at home game, Oscars Bingo! Just like last year, I've made bingo cards. Yes, there are a couple other people making them online, including The Academy Awards website itself with its product placement-tastic version, but homemade version is more unabashedly partisan, and thus (to my mind) funnier.

But don't take my word on it, click on the cut tag!
This way to the bingo cards! )
grey_bard: (Scary writer place)

It's that time again! Award show season. And time for that favorite play along at home game, Oscars Bingo! Yes, there are a couple other people making them online, including The Academy Awards website itself with its product placement-tastic version, but homemade version is more unabashedly partisan, and thus (to my mind) funnier.

But don't take my word on it, click the cut tag! )

I made a full set of these with randomised square-order for the upcoming New York ONTD_StarTrek Oscars party and uploaded it. The full set of twelve cards can be downloaded here.
grey_bard: (Scary writer place)
IT'S THAT TIME AGAIN FOLKS!

The beneficent wonderful straight people are here to save us poor queers from those mean nasty slashers using us for their pervy othering desires. (And / or the wrong "kind" of slasher. The kind with fewer enlightened trappings of guilt. Hey look guys! It's our straight slasher savior!)

Everyone thank the straight people. Awww.

But oh! Wait!

Some of those mean nasty slashers, no wait, a LOT of those mean nasty slashers are queer too! HOLD THE PHONE!

I'm a lesbian. I always would have been no matter what I read. I'm not secretly a straight girl saying this for indie cred / oppression olympics points. I am the real freaking deal. And I'm not alone. We're here, we exist and there are a hell of a lot of us. You may not realize that the fan you're talking to is L/G/B/T or Q, but when you talk about slash fanfiction writing fans as straight women - usually right before saying something moderately to severely insulting about us - you're erasing us. You're telling us we don't matter in the service of making your little crusade to "benefit" us. WHOOP DE FREAKING DO. I feel so protected!

Is some slash fanfiction written by straight people creepy and exploitative, or at the very least kind of hinky? Sure. Do some non-straight people feel skeeved or exploited by it? I wouldn't be surprised, and I'm sure their thoughts are interesting and valid.

But so are the opinions and feelings of the L/G/B/T and Q people actually in slash fandom. Like me. And look at your fic comms, look at your f-lists. We're here.  Don't ignore us or pretend we don't exist or are somehow unimportant if you're really as interested in the feelings of the non-straight as you claim.

Would I still be a lesbian without slash? Hell yes. I'd just have spent my late teen years a hell of a lot more confused and alone. I like reimagining the fictional world as being as gay as the real one I live in. I like having thousands and thousands of wonderful, creative, interesting writers to help me do it. And it doesn't bother me that a large percentage of them are straight any more than it bothers me to watch straight musicals written by gay people. That's just me.

Some people who are being a lot more articulate than I'm feeling have some interesting things to say on the subject, and some interesting comment threads too, so I'll just go and redirect you there. Over to you, Fairestcat and Maryaminx.

Disclaimer: I do not know them from Adam, I do not claim to, but these two posts are pretty smart.
grey_bard: (Useless Knowledge?)
Spock/Uhura is a pairing, not a warning.
grey_bard: (Reinstall universe)

Dear Fandom,

Stop killing the women to get the babies. No, I'm serious. Stop killing the women to get the babies. And NO, being all "Oh, gee, I know this bothers some people, but I hope mine is different 'cause I actually like women" does NOT make it any better. Or at least, not better enough to count.

What the hell is this, a Disney movie? NOT ALL MOTHERS DIE.

I'm saying this as someone who *loves* kidfic, and loves slash, this nonsense gets old. Fast. In order to have the gay hero have kids, someone we have never seen before comes out of the woodwork, says "I'm dying" and conveniently bestows his biological kid upon him. And that, aside from a few sniffles on the kid's part, is the end of her.  Her death was a necessary entrance ticket to the world of biological fatherhood. And now that she's conveniently kicked the bucket, it is time for puppies and ice cream! Again and again and again.

If you don't have a female character whose life is already canonically in danger in some way (works in dangerous profession, already has life threatening illness, planet blew up) and/or  you don't intend to give her death any emotional impact of note to her child or its father, how do you not see this might be a kind of sketchy recurring trope? For a gay man to have a kid a woman he had sex with needs to die? She's a pasted on dead womb! Wooo.

Why can't the mother just not be ready for motherhood and give the father custody? Why not have a kid on purpose, and no one needs to die? Surrogacy or having a kid with a single woman or nice lesbian couple who want kids. If you're in the world of sci fi, I would like to introduce you to the concept of the uterine replicator. Oh those wacky Ancients / Mad Scientists / Aliens / Californians in Space! What about a pre-existing kid who is already a member of his family? Or why not some kid, not biologically related, already lacking parents? I hear there's this thing called adoption.

Do I mean you? Yes, I mean you. Whoever you are, reading this, however much I love your fic or you personally.

No, I don't tell you this in the comments of your fic, because that would be rude and pointless. And hey, other than that aspect, maybe you wrote a good story which I am pretending to myself began in a different way.

Yeah, I know this is kind of wanky for me, but for once I do not give a damn. I've seen it one too many times, with that stupid disclaimer attached. 

Note: comments are welcome, but if I don't already know who you are, I reserve the right not to care what a random stranger has to say.
grey_bard: (Default)


Title: Species Diversity and You: A Sexual Safety Presentation
Rating: PG-13
Warnings: Innuendo, humor and mild subversiveness
Spoilers: Passing reference to an element of the Enterprise episode "Cogenitor"
Summary: A presentation from Starfleet Medical's Sexual Safety program, presented by cute animated mascots
Word count: 1,024
Genre: Gen, I suppose, since no characters actually *do* anything, they just talk about theoretical other beings doing it.
Email: fitzrose @ email.msn.com
Notes: Written for Trek Novel Fest, inspired by the meta-tastic "instructional filmstrip" humor piece "Dilithium and You!" that somehow made it into an authorized novel despite being hilariously biting and true.
 

FROM Species Diversity and You, an animated presentation from Starfleet Medical's Sexual Safety program, mandatory viewing for all Starfleet personnel upon leaving their planet of origin. )
grey_bard: (Default)
Sometimes, it comes about that the powers that be do something with the potential to be deeply stupid and annoying. This will, obviously, annoy you. And you want to do something, so you write a letter. Possibly many letters!

However, not all letters are created equal in the eyes of the people reading them. Here are some suggestions on how to write a letter they might possibly take a little more seriously, using current fannish issues with Stargate Atlantis Season 4 as an example.

Warning: SPOILERS under the cut

What to write, what not to write, some suggestions: )
grey_bard: (Default)
Why can't more writers and show creators learn the lesson of Joss? The man's a class act, and his fans will follow him anywhere. People talk about how hard it is to deal with an interactive internet fandom and the demands of fans, but really, the formula is very simple. Joss mastered it way back in the 90's.

1) Do whatever you think best in your books or shows. They're yours and you do have that right.

2) Don't insult the fans.

VERY SIMPLE RULES. Don't muck around with weaselly explanations of why it had to be that way, no really, and anyone who doesn't get it is a fool. Don't call your fans whiny fat people in muumuus for having opinions out loud. Don't feel like they're "forcing" you to write what they want, and thus write half hearted attempts at it and ruin your work. Just do what you do and then shut up about it!

People may not always agree with your decisions, but if you don't act like a defensive patronizing whiner, at least they might treat you with, I don't know, respect?